Sarah White May 16, 2018

 RECEIVING AN OLEV GRANT & THE FUTURE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES

WHAT IS OLEV?

The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) is connected to both the UK Department of Transport and the UK Department of Trade, Energy, and Industrial Strategy. It exists to promote the adoption of low emission vehicles. OLEV, Encourages car buyers to opt for an electric vehicle, OLEV offers help with startup costs.If you own or rent an electric vehicle, you could receive up to £500 towards the cost of buying and installing a ChargePoint.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I AM ELIGIBLE?

Both the manufacturer and the installer of your ChargePoint need to be authorized by OLEV for a successful application.To see if your electric vehicle model is eligible for an OLEV grant, check the following list.

category 1 cars:

These vehicles have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and can travel at least 112km (70 miles) without any CO2 emissions at all:

  • BMW i3 and i3s
  • BYD e6
  • Citroen CZero
  • Hyundai ONIQ
  • Kia Soul EV
  • Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric Drive
  • Nissan e-NV200 (5-seater and 7-seater)
  • Nissan LEAF
  • Peugeot iOn
  • Renault ZOE
  • Smart EQ fortwo
  • Smart EQ forfour
  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model X
  • Toyota Mirai
  • Volkswagen e-up!
  • Volkswagen e-Golf

For more vehicles that are eligible please visit: https://www.gov.uk/plug-in-car-van-grants

You can get a free quote for work-place charging points here.

HOW DO I APPLY FOR A GRANT?

The grant is actually applied for on your behalf, by your OLEV approved installer.

 

THE FUTURE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING:

 

The momentum behind the shift towards electric vehicles (EVs) is now clearer than ever. The UK Government’s announcement to stop all sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040 is the latest in a string of high-profile policy decisions in recent months.

France, of course, has already announced its own ban on petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040. Car manufacturer Volvo will produce only electric or hybrid vehicles from 2019. Meanwhile, BMW has announced that an electric version of the Mini will be built in the UK, with production starting in 2019.

These are seismic decisions when you consider that at present there are only around 100,000 electric vehicles in the UK, which compares with a total car fleet of 31 million. The full details of the government’s announcement are still being studied, but the message is unavoidable – EVs are on the rise and it’s now a question of ‘when’ not ‘if’ the transition from the internal combustion engine will happen.

 

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